Whether because we didn't have much in common or we weren't willing to put in much effort, my conversations rarely left the texting stage.When they did, second dates were rare and thirds were almost unheard of.

Of course, nothing about me had changed, so this line of reasoning didn't actually make any sense.

Once I got over that hump, it was nice to not have people constantly evaluating how good my photos looked, and I think it made me, in turn, a bit less preoccupied with my looks.5.

As with Twitter, Facebook, Linked In, and email, I checked it compulsively with the hope that some exciting notification would greet me on the homepage. I also realized that when I used Tinder, I was swiping compulsively to try to find out who my "super likes" were, often not even reading profiles.

I wasn't even messaging the people I matched with—I just wanted the ego boost of getting a match.

But once dating stopped being such a big part of my life and I wasn't virtually surrounded by people seeking a partner, I began to realize a few years is not a long time at all.

It just felt long because I wasn't comfortable being single—and I wasn't comfortable being single because I just hadn't allowed myself to be.Dating sites can cause major anxiety A recent study in found that phone addiction causes depression and anxiety, and in my experience, online dating addiction has the same effects.When you rely on something for self-esteem or excitement, you feel disappointed when you don't see these rewards and you withdraw from other sources of happiness.Back when FOMO was keeping me glued to my apps, I wish someone had reassured me other prospects would come my way if I looked up for a second.2.Online dating is addictive Right after I decided to stop going on OKCupid, I actually had to stop my hands from typing the "o" into my browser when I wanted a work break (OK I slipped up a few times, I'll admit it).Looking for love can backfire When I met my partner, I was in the opposite mindset from when I was online dating.