The most common cliché is that of the boss with his secretary but there are many other examples of work-based relationships, from the snog at the Christmas party to getting frisky in the supplies cupboard.

Work-based relationships aren’t always superficial and it is almost inevitable that at some point in your career you’ll develop a crush on someone at work.

If nobody seems to notice, there's no reason to share. You and your new partner need to agree on some ground rules and come up with a plan for how you will keep it professional and stay within written or unwritten rules. "You may have the burden of overcompensating with professionalism and keeping an artificial distance, which can be an awkward strain," says Taylor.

"What will be your plan 'B' if the heat is on from a supervisor, from gossip, or if things go awry? "Better to overcompensate than to constantly test the limits of workplace etiquette while hoping for the best." Be sensitive and respectful to others.

My answer to all three: "Nope — because we followed the rules." The truth is, office romances are tricky and generally not recommended.

" Those are questions I'm frequently asked when I tell people the story of my office romance.

“You’re creating a climate where people are going to see bias whether there really is bias or not.” Relationships with your peers are generally more acceptable—assuming they’re unhitched.

A stunning 20% of people who told Career Builder that they had dated someone at the office admitted that at least one person in the relationship was married.

"The bottom line is, you need to tread carefully," she adds.

"If, however, love happens to strike at work, don't make a concerted effort to fight it at any cost.

Just know the risks." Your decision not only affects you, but other person, both your careers, and those around you.

"A word to the wise: If you take the leap, go into it with your eyes wide open," Taylor concludes.

After firing CEO Dov Charney last month, American Apparel decided to update its company code of ethics with stricter guidelines regarding interoffice relationships.