Below: Perhaps my favorite 1960’s guitars, the Domino’s.I have owned many Domino Californian’s over the years (the VOX Phantom copy). Domino made one of the better quality reproduction guitars in the late sixties.For most North American kids, including myself, their first guitar was an EKO or some Japanese import. these were all too expensive for our parents to buy for us.

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The Spartan pickguard was autographed by Edwyn Collins.

Below: If your first electric guitar was in the 1960’s, there is a good chance it was a Teisco. The Teisco Del Ray was perhaps the most popular student guitar from the 1960’s. It was recently re-issued through the Eastwood Custom Shop. Hagstrom made some wonderful guitars with exceptionally fast necks.

You can see the inspiration for the Sidejack Series in many of these guitars. Then, a 9.5 Silvertone Mosrite and a VERY odd and curious guitar labeled CONTESSA.

Interesting because it as an indiviual slider volume for each pickup, so you can dial in an unlimited variety of tones. An early 1960’s Vivona which was made by EKO, and a wee Hi-Tone. It is from Italy, and looks, feels, smells, just like the JG Italians. Below: On the left is a RARE Wandre Doris from the mid 1960’s. Next is a nice ’67 Fender Jaguar and the ’67 Domino Spartan, costing about 7000% less. ) Though nothing really beats the mojo of owning a true, vintage instrument, at least Eastwood have, over the past decade, done a great job at bringing back some of those gems, as mentioned before.

History In 1951, Matsumoku was founded as “Matsumoto Mokko” (In English: Matsumoto Woodworking Company) by Mr. It was a family owned woodworking business that specialized in building tansu and butsudan.

On the other hand, shortly after the World War II (1939-1945), the Singer Corporation had established a Japanese subsidiary, Singer Sewing Machine Company, Japan, and set up production facilities in Nagoya.

Matsumoku Industrial was contracted to build its sewing machine cabinets, and in 1951 Matsumoku became a partially owned subsidiary of Singer, Japan.