Once you get into your fifties and beyond, the actual number of your age becomes less and less significant.

Far more important is what shape you are in, how healthy you are, what activities you can do. If you’re active and like going for long walks and playing golf, you’re going to be much more interested in the fit and energetic 82-year-old who can share your activities than the 65-year-old with the hip replacement who can no longer walk long distances. Stitch Update: the registrations we are now seeing for Stitch is consistent with this sentiment, where the 50% of people are seeking companionship and not romance are telling us that age isn’t important to them as long as their companion can keep up with them.

Because no matter how old you get, one thing about human nature never changes: nobody likes feeling lonely.

Older adults, however, look for companionship in a way that’s very different from their younger counterparts.

This is why, for most older adults, a dinner date is the most important first step towards finding companionship.

This makes quite a comparison to how many young people organize their first dates, which usually involve meeting up in a bar.

One thing we have been struck with has been the important role that dinner plays in the social (or not-so-social) lives of most older adults.

Nobody likes the idea of spending years cooking for themselves and eating alone.

The hottest online dating app for young people today is Tinder, which proudly claims to be matching over 450 million love-seekers daily.

Take a quick look at the Tinder user interface to the left.

And always being the lone single person when your married friends want to catch up for dinner starts to become a little tiresome.

More than any other activity, dinner is where older adults feel the isolation of being alone most strongly.

The response was overwhelming: 500 registrations in less than 3 days, and over 250 very detailed comments.