The people who attend conventions catering to geeks—like the bustling celebration of video games, graphic novels, and anime that was last month’s New York Comic Con—don’t have the best reputations in the wider culture.

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Another way that Comic Con speed dating is more accepting of nontraditional relationships is that there are transparently nonmonogamous people participating.

Adam W., 33, a handsome black man who came dressed as Elwood Blues from , is in a long-distance open relationship.

While she was ambivalent about meeting someone at the event, she said she preferred the face-to-face contact because her experience on online dating sites taught her the Internet maxim that people lie in photos.

A frequent con-goer (who is into horror and costume drama as well as and anime), Regina explained how the normal dating preferences often disqualified women like her: "I have a hard time with Caucasian men because I'm taller. Punk rock guys wanna date size zero Gap girls, not me." She expressed interest in "beautiful Korean and Asian boys," but also had a list of requirements, including no one named Jimmy and no one in a band.

You are not God's gift to women, women are God's gift to you. Dater No.19, who declined to provide his real name, decided to “take one for the team” as he couldn’t convince any of his other single friends to come.

Even at Comic Con, the stigma for participating is high—even though we are at a convention where people run around in superhero costumes, it is still seen as uncool to admit to using a dating service.

And, unlike traditional dating circles that try to encourage women to forgo feminist ideas in order to win true love—never call a man! To carve out a space where women set the tone for engagement is nothing less than amazing.

One company, Lightning Fast Speed Dating, is combining the resurgence of nerdy pastimes and our increasingly single population’s quest for love.

Two years ago, the company launched a convention-specific program geared at fans and enthusiasts 18 and over, promising the potential to “meet your own superhero or shinobi [ninja],” the program, which was free to this year’s 100,000 attendees, was a runaway success.

The demand was so great that they added a sixth, stealth session, announced only to those who were turned away from the advertised events.

But, by mid-evening, Regina was happily engaged and chatting with men of all races, her hot pink painted mouth upturned in a shy smile.