Messianic Judaism is the same faith but it is expressed within the Jewish heritage. The writers of the Brit Chadashah (New Covenant or Testament) were Jewish (with the possible exception of Luke, and a good case can be made that he too was Jewish), and for a time, the faith was strictly Jewish.

It was always God’s will for the Gentile nations to share in His salvation (Isaiah 42:6, 49:6).

God told Abraham that through him all the nations of the Earth would be blessed (Genesis 12:1-3).

We are brought near to God because of the atoning work of Yeshua, Israel’s Chief Rabbi, who has fulfilled us as Jewish Believers and fulfilled Judaism itself.

In one sense, Messianic Judaism and Christianity are the same thing. Messianic Jews and Christians share the same core beliefs.

In fact, the Hebrew Scriptures themselves affirm that they are not complete, but that God was going to make a New Covenant with the Jewish people (Jeremiah -34).

We believe that the Sinai covenant, upon which much of traditional (Rabbinic) Judaism is based, is a broken covenant.

answers some of the questions frequently asked about Messianic Judaism.

Messianic Judaism is a movement of Jewish people who believe that Yeshua (Jesus’ original name in Hebrew) is the Messiah of Israel and the Savior of the world. Yeshua was a descendant of both Abraham and King David, was raised in a Jewish home and went to synagogue.

Non-Messianic or Rabbinic Judaism is a religion centered around the teachings and writings of the non-Messianic rabbis.

Its formation began during the Babylonian Captivity (around 550 BC) and solidified nearly 2,000 years ago when the Second Temple was destroyed in 70 AD.

By the end of the first century, Gentile Believers outnumbered the Jewish Believers.