The ultimate goal of prevention and intervention is to stop dating violence before it begins.

During the preteen and teen years, young people are learning the skills they need to form positive, healthy relationships with others.

In one rigorous NIJ-funded study, school-level interventions in 30 New York City public middle schools reduced dating violence by up to 50 percent.[2]Researchers evaluated dating violence and sexual harassment interventions by randomly assigning classes to receive: Youth exposed to domestic violence are at greater risk for being both a victim and the perpetrator of dating violence.

prevention of dating violence-79prevention of dating violence-48

These teens also had high rates of exposure to bullying, sexual harassment and peer aggression, as both victims and perpetrators.

Overall, the mothers and youth reported that they enjoyed the booklets and found them helpful and informative.

Break the Cycle Futures Without Violence Intimate Partner Violence(Center for Disease Control and Prevention) Love is Not Abuse Love is Respect National Domestic Violence Hotline National Sexual Violence Resource Center Prevent Connect Texas Council on Family Violence Violence Against Women(United States Department of Justice) Violence Against Women Online Resources What is Dating Violence?

Dating Violence is the use of harassing, controlling, and/or abusive behavior to maintain power and control over a partner in a romantic relationship.

The researchers adjusted the protocol recruitment strategies, data collection procedures, measures, and program administration, and eliminated the follow-up calls from the health educator.

They also determined that the intervention was reaching the high-risk group: teens who had been exposed to an average of seven years of domestic violence and had high rates of dating violence compared with national averages.

The study suggests that high-risk girls can successfully participate in and benefit from relational programming. Final report submitted to the National Institute of Justice, grant number 2008-MU-MU-0010, October 2011, NCJ 236175. Michael Bowling, "Assessing the Effects of Families for Safe Dates, a Family-Based Teen Dating Abuse Prevention Program," 51 (March 2012): 349-356.[note 5] Coker, Ann L., Robert E.

Read an abstract and access the final report [note 1] Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. [note 3] Ehrensaft, Miriam K., Patricia Cohen, Jocelyn Brown, Elizabeth Smailes, Henian Chen, and Jeffrey G. "Intergenerational Transmission of Partner Violence: A 20-Year Prospective Study," 71 (August 2003): 741-753.

The girls were assigned randomly to receive one of two curriculums: A third group of 42 girls were enrolled in the study but did not participate in a curriculum intervention.

Overall, the girls reported positive experiences about participating in a curriculum.

[note 4] Foshee, Vangie A., Heath Luz Mc Naughton Reyes, Susan T.