All plants were responsible for the transformation, but Archaeopteris was important because it made up 90 percent of the forests during the last 15 million years when these changes accelerated" ...

"It was the first plant to produce an extensive root system, so had a profound impact on soil chemistry".

The amoeba has no hard part, but some single cell organisms produce microscopic skeletons or shells. Fossil evidence is consistent with these gene-based estimates. which, from a supposed resemblance.the blossom of a liliaceous plant have been denominated Encrinites". But things changed in the : There were no land animals and extinctions were confined to water life.

cells with nuclei certainly existed by 1,200,000,000 years ago. In 1835, William Kirby in On Power of God in Creation of Animals 2. There were two distinct extinctions roughly a million years apart.

) 13,800,000,000 (13.8 billion) years ago The creation of the universe according to present estimates of "big bang" - "Stephen Hawkings and others...

estimate between 18 and 11 billion with 13.8 being the closest estimation".

The reference relates to Multicellular filaments from arctic Canada identified as a red algae Bangiomorpha pubescens. The curtain rises on a drama in the sea that has already begun, and has been going on for some time". London, Published by James Reynolds 174 Strand, 20t.10.1849. The first of these began about 443 million years ago.

"In all but detail, this fossil is indistinguishable from modern Bangia" for the Ediacaran fossils to first appear, 655,000,000 years ago. This showed life beginning with the Silurian system, which it described as "a marine deposit of vast extent containing abundance of marine organic remains. Together, these extinctions may have removed about 85 percent of species of marine animals.

This was not adopted, but his division into Mississippian, for the 's "Story of a piece of coal" focuses on coal formation, but includes a section on the carboniferous limestone.

It lists (but does not discuss) the intervening millstone grit.

He began to do this in 1866 in the General Morphology. about 419,2000,000 to 393,300,000 years ago Early Devonian The vegetation of the early Devonian consisted primarily of small plants, the tallest being only a meter tall.

By the end of the Devonian, "The earth's atmosphere was changing rapidly, going from perhaps 10 percent to 1 percent CO2 and from about 5 percent to 20 percent oxygen over a 50- million year period in the (late) Devonian period.

By carboniferous [carbon bearing] soils, Richard Kirwan in 1799 meant the "various sorts of earth or stone among or under which coal is usually found".