King suffered from depression throughout much of his life.

In his adolescent years, he initially felt resentment against whites due to the "racial humiliation" that he, his family, and his neighbors often had to endure in the segregated South.

King once reproved another student for keeping beer in his room, saying they had shared responsibility as African Americans to bear "the burdens of the Negro race." For a time, he was interested in Walter Rauschenbusch's "social gospel." In his third year at Morehouse, King became romantically involved with the white daughter of an immigrant German woman who worked as a cook in the cafeteria.

sex dating in selma ohio-67

King planned to marry her, but friends advised against it, saying that an interracial marriage would provoke animosity from both blacks and whites, potentially damaging his chances of ever pastoring a church in the South.

King tearfully told a friend that he could not endure his mother's pain over the marriage and broke the relationship off six months later.

King was on the committee from the Birmingham African-American community that looked into the case; because Colvin was pregnant and unmarried, E. Nixon and Clifford Durr decided to wait for a better case to pursue.

In 1957, King, Ralph Abernathy, Fred Shuttlesworth, Joseph Lowery, and other civil rights activists founded the Southern Christian Leadership Conference (SCLC).

The group was created to harness the moral authority and organizing power of black churches to conduct nonviolent protests in the service of civil rights reform. Vivian, Andrew Young, The Freedom Singers, Charles Evers, Cleveland Robinson, Randolph Blackwell, Annie Bell Robinson Devine, Charles Kenzie Steele, Alfred Daniel Williams King, Benjamin Hooks, Aaron Henry and Bayard Rustin.

One of the group's inspirations was the crusades of evangelist Billy Graham, who befriended King after he attended a Graham crusade in New York City in 1957. King narrowly escaped death when Izola Curry, a mentally ill black woman who believed he was conspiring against her with communists, stabbed him in the chest with a letter opener.When the boys were six, they started school: King had to attend a school for African Americans and the other boy went to one for whites (public schools were among the facilities segregated by state law).King lost his friend because the child's father no longer wanted the boys to play together.At the age of 15, King passed the exam and entered Morehouse.The summer before his last year at Morehouse, in 1947, the 18-year-old King chose to enter the ministry.He had concluded that the church offered the most assuring way to answer "an inner urge to serve humanity." King's "inner urge" had begun developing, and he made peace with the Baptist Church, as he believed he would be a "rational" minister with sermons that were "a respectful force for ideas, even social protest." The African-American students of Crozer for the most part conducted their social activity on Edwards Street.