One rule might be that your teen must introduce you to the person she plans to hang out with before being allowed to go.

For instance, kids who don’t want to be alone with their date can ask a friend to stay close by or help come up with an excuse to leave.

Kids with ADHD often do best when they have structure and boundaries. That’s why it’s important to set rules about dating—and stick with them.

Group dating is good practice for exercising good judgment.

It can also help kids stay safe and make better decisions.

When your teen with ADHD starts dating, it can be an exciting time. Trouble with executive function, including impulsivity, can lead teens with ADHD (also known as ADD) into difficult situations that they don’t know how to get out of.

Trouble with social skills may create awkward or unsafe encounters.

Assure her she can call you anytime she feels uneasy or unsafe, and you’ll come and get her, no questions asked.

Also, make sure your child leaves the house with enough money to get home using a car service or public transportation.

It’s important to do that even if the topic makes you uncomfortable.

For some parents, talking with their child about sex is difficult.

Tell her if she’s running a little late, she should call or text that she’s on her way.