The purpose of the image of the two Time magazine covers, and of the Coming Ice Age Myth, is not to show the real history of climate science, but to obscure that history and to cause confusion. Because today, when there really is a consensus about climate science and 97% of climatologists agree that adding CO2 to the atmosphere is leading to climate change, only 45% of the public know about that consensus.

The other 55% must think we’re still in the 1970s when scientists were still debating the issue.

What about this cover from December 1973 with Archie Bunker shivering in his chair entitled “The Big Freeze”? Maybe this cover from January 1977, again entitled “The Big Freeze”? How about this one from December 1979, “The Cooling of America”? Check out: Ubuntu and Linux Books ___________________ Now, there really were news articles in the 1970s about scientists predicting a coming ice age. People have collected lists and lists of “Coming Ice Age” stories from newspapers, magazines, books, tv shows, etc. But if it was such a big news story why did it never make the cover of America’s flagship news magazine like the faked image implies? In the 1970s there were a few developments in climate science: The realization that very long cycles in earth’s orbit could cause the waxing and waning of ice ages, coupled with the fact that our soot and aerosols were already causing cooling, led some scientists to conclude that we may be headed for another ice age. However, the warming effects of CO2 had been known for over a century, and new research in the 1970s was showing that CO2 warming would more than compensate for the cooling caused by aerosols, resulting in net warming.

Check out: Books on programming, especially for kids ________________________________ This, in a very brief nutshell, was the state of climate science in the 1970s.

And so the media of the time published many stories about a coming ice age, which made for timely reading during some very cold winters.

But many news stories also mentioned that other important detail about CO2: that our climate might soon change due to global warming.

The faked image illustrates one of the fake-skeptics’ favorite myths: The 1970s Ice Age Scare.

It goes something like this: The entire purpose of this myth is to suggest that scientists can’t be trusted, that they will say/claim/predict whatever to get their names in the newspapers, and that the media falls for it all the time.

You filled out a questionnaire, fed it into the machine, and almost instantly received a card with the name and address of a like-minded participant in some far-flung locale—your ideal match. He called up his friend Robert Ross, a programmer at I. M., and they began considering ways to adapt this approach to find matches closer to home. “This loser happens to be a talented fashion illustrator for one of New York’s largest advertising agencies.

They’d heard about some students at Harvard who’d come up with a program called Operation Match, which used a computer to find dates for people. She makes Quiche Lorraine, plays chess, and like me she loves to ski. ”One day, a woman named Patricia Lahrmer, from 1010 WINS, a local radio station, came to to do an interview.

Some add an extra layer of projection and interpretation; they adhere to a certain theory of compatibility, rooted in psychology or brain chemistry or genetic coding, or they define themselves by other, more readily obvious indicators of similitude, such as race, religion, sexual predilection, sense of humor, or musical taste.

There are those which basically allow you to browse through profiles as you would boxes of cereal on a shelf in the store.

Others choose for you; they bring five boxes of cereal to your door, ask you to select one, and then return to the warehouse with the four others. It is tempting to think of online dating as a sophisticated way to address the ancient and fundamental problem of sorting humans into pairs, except that the problem isn’t very old.