Avoid these blunders to end up with cabinets you can't wait to show off: Painted cabinets look lovely, but they aren't going to look totally smooth.

"If the cabinets have a visible open grain, the grooves are going to show through the paint," warns Don Fahrbach, president of professional painting company PNP Craftsmen in New York City.

"To fix it, you'll have to sand it and repaint it all over again."It's tempting to skip this step, but consider this: "Your finished kitchen could look amazing then, three weeks or three months later, knots in the wood can start to bleed through your paint," warns Petersik.

Use a stain-blocking primer (she likes Kilz Clean Start), and you won't get surprise blotches as the paint cures.

Painted cabinets are ruling Pinterest these days, since intrepid DIYers love the idea of updating their kitchens with only a few coats of a new color.

It seems like a no-brainer project, but this undertaking actually has many potential pitfalls.

Most kitchens need less than two gallons, so the splurge isn't going to break the budget (plus you're skipping hiring a pro, so treat your amateur skills to the best, easiest-to-use materials). Virginia at Live Love DIY follows her brush strokes with a foam roller to smooth things out.

And a more experienced DIYer might like the finish provided by a spray gun (like Jenny at Little Green Notebook uses), but it's a bit more unwieldy than a brush.

She suggests painting a big poster board with a tester can in the color you're considering (you can usually get a small one for just ).

"Hang it up next to your backsplash and your appliances and make sure that's really the color you want."Petersik has tried all sorts of paint and she's had the best results from Benjamin Moore Advance.

"Your cabinets and hardware will start to chip and show signs of wear within a month — or even immediately." Once the paint on the hinges starts to crack, all you can do is sand everything down and soak the hardware to remove the paint, so save yourself the aggravation.